101st Anniversary Of Women Voting – Lori Harrison-Kahan, Author of Book on Women’s Suffrage

Lori-Harrison-Kahan-Author

“#MeToo as an idea isn’t new….(W)omen journalists (have been) shedding light on the obstacles, indignities, and violence women face in the workplace….(since) the late 19th and early 20th centuries, when a significant cohort of women entered the newspaper industry.” Lori Harrison-Kahan in an OpEd on CNN.com August 18th is the 101st anniversary of the 19th… Continue reading 101st Anniversary Of Women Voting – Lori Harrison-Kahan, Author of Book on Women’s Suffrage

Strategies of Black Women Suffragists – Marcia Chatelain, Professor of African American Studies at Georgetown University

Black women suffragists were quite strategic though, as you’ll hear as you listen to professor Marcia Chatelain, professor of history and African American Studies at Georgetown University. Dr. Chatelain also has a fascinating take on the impact of Senator Kamala Harris as the Democratic Vice Presidential Nominee.

100 Years of Women Voting – Lori Harrison-Kahan, Author of Book on Female Suffrage Journalist Miriam Michelson

Lori-Harrison-Kahan-Author

As we commemorate the centennial of the 19th Amendment, which gave women the right to vote, here is a glimpse into an untold part of the story: a woman journalist who supported the cause by using her work to keep the movement in the headlines: Miriam Michelson, She also happens to be my great-great aunt.… Continue reading 100 Years of Women Voting – Lori Harrison-Kahan, Author of Book on Female Suffrage Journalist Miriam Michelson

The Economic Crisis’ Impact on Women – Heather Long, Washington Post Senior Economic Reporter

“Women are being hit disproportionately hard, because they hold disproportionately more of the jobs being shutdown and (still) have the lion’s share of family responsibilities….The industries hit hard by this crisis are healthcare, social care, education, restaurants, cleaning services, personal care and clothing stores, and the front lines of them are dominated by women.” Heather… Continue reading The Economic Crisis’ Impact on Women – Heather Long, Washington Post Senior Economic Reporter

Men & Women & Innovation – Joanne Lipman, Fmr WSJ, Gannett Top Executive

“Men, perfectly good guys, really don’t know what the issues are, who we as women are unintentionally demonizing, and who, if we brought them into the conversation could be part of the solution.” Diversity is a business and innovation imperative, and studies show the financial crisis was caused by groupthink and too much testosterone running… Continue reading Men & Women & Innovation – Joanne Lipman, Fmr WSJ, Gannett Top Executive

Flint Water Unresolved – Talia Buford, Journalist, ProPublica

“(People in Flint) are living in…a war zone…it’s not America. You’re constantly on guard…and feel invisible,” Tali Buford on Electric Ladies Podcast We were all outraged by the poisoning of small children, as well as adults, in Flint, Michigan as a result of lead in the city’s water. It may have fallen off the national… Continue reading Flint Water Unresolved – Talia Buford, Journalist, ProPublica

Planet Word Museum – Ann Friedman, CEO, Founder, Creator

“You learn the techniques that make a song or a speech or that ad really effective and persuasive..” Ann Friedman on Green Connections Radio. We are experiencing every day how powerful words are, ours and other people’s. From the 2020 election to social media, to the protests for equality and climate change, to advertisements and music.  Now, there’s a brand new interactive museum in Washington, DC about language and how it’s effective and persuasive. Listen to this enlightening conversation with Ann Friedman, Founder, CEO & Creator of Planet Word and Green Connections Radio host Joan Michelson about how to bring language to life. We included some sound from the exhibits too, to take you inside.

The Economic Crisis’ Impact on Women – Heather Long, Washington Post Senior Economic Reporter

“Women are being hit disproportionately hard, because they hold disproportionately more of the jobs being shutdown and (still) have the lion’s share of family responsibilities….The industries hit hard by this crisis are healthcare, social care, education, restaurants, cleaning services, personal care and clothing stores, and the front lines of them are dominated by women.” Joan Michelson’s Forbes Blog. Listen to Heather Long, Washington Post give us the real facts and suggestions for moving forward in this fascinating interview on Green Connections Radio podcast with host Joan Michelson.

‘From Dowdy To Dazzling’ – Lessons For Women Today From The Suffragists

As we embark on a crucial presidential election, today, women voters are the largest single voting bloc, but, as most of us know, that right to vote was a hard-fought battle 100 years ago. That is, ratification of the 19th Amendment in 1920.
To commemorate that centennial, this Women’s History Month, I sat down with one of the foremost chroniclers of the suffrage movement, Brooke Kroeger, to tell us how it happened and glean lessons for women today.

The seeds of #MeToo started growing 100 years ago Opinion by Lori Harrison-Kahan

In their book “She Said: Breaking the Sexual Harassment Story That Helped Ignite a Movement,” journalists Jodi Kantor and Megan Twohey detail how their reporting on the Harvey Weinstein case inspired women across the country to come forward with their own stories.
Lori Harrison-Kahan
But while the hashtag that originated with activist Tarana Burke went viral after Kantor, Twohey and Ronan Farrow exposed the sexual misconduct allegations against Weinstein, #MeToo as an idea isn’t new. Kantor and Twohey are part of a long tradition of women journalists whose work has fueled feminist movements, particularly by shedding light on the obstacles, indignities, and violence women face in the workplace.
The symbiosis between journalism and women’s activism dates back to the late 19th and early 20th centuries, when a significant cohort of women entered the newspaper industry. Elizabeth Jordan, for example, began her career writing for the Chicago Tribune and the New York World in the 1880s and 1890s, eventually working her way up to the editorship of Harper’s Bazar (as it was then spelled).